Roofing Tips

Insurance FAQ's

How can I check the status of my claim?

You can check the status of your claim by contacting your insurance company either via telephone and/or online.

When will someone inspect my damage?

The insurance company will contact you to schedule a convenient appointment time. Inform your insurance company that you would like your roofer present, and let your Lincoln Douglas representative know when your appointment is scheduled.

What happens next?

After your damages are evaluated, your insurance provider will create an estimate. Your estimate typically spells out what needs to be repaired and/or replaced, as well as what is covered under your policy.

Why is there depreciation shown on the estimate?

Depreciation is typically shown on all estimates for items that are not brand new. Depreciation is a decrease of the item's value due to age, wear, or market conditions. Your estimate may include depreciation for items & materials that are being replaced. However, once the replacement of your covered loss has been completed, you may be able to recover the depreciation amount that was withheld depending on your policy terms, conditions, and exclusions.

What's a deductible? When do I need to pay it and to whom?

A deductible is the portion of a loss covered that you are responsible for under your policy. For example, if your covered claim is for $4,500 and your deductible is $500, your insurer pays $4,000. The settlement check you receive from the insurer will be based on the amount of your covered loss from the estimate minus your deductible and any applicable depreciation. In most cases, you would pay the amount of your deductible directly to your contractor once repairs are completed.

What if my contractor's estimate is different from the insurance estimate?

Lincoln Douglas sets prices to stay in line with the majority of insurance companies. Insurance discrepancies can be due to measurements, uncovered items, or outdated pricing. A Lincoln Douglas representative can offer you the assistance you need by dealing with your insurance company directly to resolve any issues. A representative may also make any necessary adjustments.

What style is your roof?

 

 

The Lean-To or Shed Roof is the simplest style, consisting of a single sloping plane with no hips, valleys, or ridges. A single-slope roof is probably lowest in construction cost and time. If a lower-pitched roof is attached against the eave of a steeper pitch, or against a wall, it is usually referred to as a lean-to roof. This is a common roof shape for rooms or storage spaces added to existing structure. 

Lean-To

 

A flat roof is just that, flat. Flat roofs are easy to build and require fewer materials and labor than most other types of roofs, which is why they are so commonly used on commercial buildings. A flat roof is not very attractive on most styles of homes, but will be found on some modern style homes and many multi-family residential dwellings.

 
 

Flat

 

A hip and ridge roof has four sides that slope up. It is also low-pitched to allow snow and rain to easily run off and features large eaves. A hip and ridge roof is more aerodynamic than most gabled roofs, allowing it to better withstand high winds.

Hip and Ridge

 

The classic gable roof has two slopes forming a ridge or a peak at the top. From either end, the gable looks like the letter A. Gabled roofs must be braced properly to prevent damage or collapse due to high winds. A very triangular roof, the gable allows rain and snow to run off easily.

 
 

Gable

 

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